Seeing isn’t always believing: Google starts fact-checking images – The Washington Post

Seeing isn’t always believing: Google starts fact-checking images – The Washington Post

The Mountain View, Calif.-based company has used these fact-checking labels for years in its main search results and on video-streaming site YouTube. In December, Google said fact checks appear more than 11 million times each day in search results.

“Photos and videos are an incredible way to help people understand what’s going on in the world,” Google product manager Harris Cohen wrote in a blog post announcing the new fact-check labels. “But the power of visual media has its pitfalls⁠ — especially when there are questions surrounding the origin, authenticity or context of an image.”

Tech companies’ efforts to fact-check the myriad claims made across their sites have become a major focal point as advertising and campaigning for the 2020 U.S. elections heats up. Twitter’s decision to label two of President Trump’s misleading tweets about mail-in ballots with fact-check links set a de facto standard for social media companies last month. Twitter labeled another tweet by Trump with a warning last week after the president tweeted a doctored video showing fake CNN headlines. The company said it violated its policies on manipulated media.

Fact-checking from social media and other tech companies has become common in the past three years — Facebook, Twitter and Google all do it to some extent — but it is by no means universal
Source…